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Biden and Trump sweep a 'Super Tuesday' with hardly any room for surprises

Nikki Haley in Vermont and the unknown Jason Palmer in American Samoa manage to avoid the plenary session of the favorite candidates for the White House.

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Biden and Trump sweep a 'Super Tuesday' with hardly any room for surprises

Nikki Haley in Vermont and the unknown Jason Palmer in American Samoa manage to avoid the plenary session of the favorite candidates for the White House

MADRID, 6 Mar. (EUROPA PRESS) -

The president of the United States, Joe Biden, and former president Donald Trump have swept this 'Super Tuesday' in the primary elections of their respective parties, the Democrat and the Republican, respectively, elections that have barely left room for surprises, as as expected, and whose full victory has been avoided by the Republican Nikki Haley in the state of Vermont and by the unknown Jason Palmer in the territory of American Samoa.

Although Haley's narrow victory in Vermont could be seen as being from one of the states with the least conservative Republicans, no one had foreseen the victory of Palmer, a until now unknown candidate, although it is a testimonial fact due to the few delegates who grants. In fact, a Biden campaign official quoted by CNN has called the defeat "dumb news."

The territory of American Samoa also experienced a similar situation in the 2020 Democratic primary elections, when it chose tycoon Michael Bloomberg as the winner, becoming its only success.

Haley, who a few days ago became the first woman in the Republican Party to win a primary election, has taken advantage of her second victory to proclaim that voters are "open to an alternative against Trump", although Democrats are already thinking about the votes among the Republicans who reject the magnate, and the Republican Party's candidacy is practically closed after a day in which 15 states and one territory have held elections.

This is why Biden has warned that a second Trump term "will bring chaos, division and darkness" to the country and that "he is determined to destroy our democracy, take away fundamental freedoms such as the ability of women to make their own decisions in health care and pass another round of billion-dollar tax cuts for the rich.

For his part, Trump has also attacked the man who is expected to be his rival in the November presidential elections for his management both in immigration policy, referring to the "invasion" of migrants, and for his actions at the international level, due to the war in Ukraine, to the conflict in the Middle East, highlighting that Biden "is the worst president in the history" of the country.

Likewise, he has defended his presidential period, in which the United States "did not have wars" and in which "it got along well with many countries", mentioning North Korea and China, the latter until the COVID-19 pandemic.

Although Biden has won comfortably in all the states, obtaining more than 80 percent support in the vast majority, it is worth highlighting the large number of "protest" votes in the state of Minnesota, where the Arab community plays an important role and where 19 percent "uncommitted" votes have been cast.

Trump has also achieved comfortable victories, although the percentages have been between 60 and 70 percent because Haley has attracted less conservative voters.

After 'Super Tuesday', projections issued by CNN estimate that Trump will manage to have a total of 936 delegates (of the 1,215 necessary to mathematically close his candidacy) compared to Haley's 85, while Biden will manage to secure 1,312 delegates of the 1,968 necessary to seal your candidacy.