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UPV researchers participate in the international team to build a synchrotron in the Greater Caribbean

These infrastructures are essential in areas such as the study of materials or the development of new medicines and vaccines.

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UPV researchers participate in the international team to build a synchrotron in the Greater Caribbean

These infrastructures are essential in areas such as the study of materials or the development of new medicines and vaccines.

VALENCIA, 7 Mar. (EUROPA PRESS) -

Researchers from the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV), the Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) and the International Physics Center of Bogotá are working on a project for the construction of a new synchrotron in the Greater Caribbean area.

In its latest issue, 'Nature' magazine includes an article about the history of this initiative and the actions that are being carried out to make it a reality.

"The project in which we are collaborating is titled Lamistad (Latin American International Synchrotron for Technology, Analysis, and Development) and its objective is to make the Light Source of the Greater Caribbean a reality. In the world of science, large facilities do not "They not only mark the path towards revolutionary discoveries, but also contribute to the development of high capabilities and equality between regions: where they are built, employment opportunities arise, improvement of skills and advances in key infrastructures," highlights Pedro Fernández de Córdoba, researcher at the University Institute of Pure and Applied Mathematics and professor at the Higher Technical School of Industrial Engineering (ETSII) of the UPV.

Within these large facilities, synchrotrons stand out for their great potential in both scientific and industrial sectors. Among other fields, they are essential in areas such as the physics of condensed matter, the study of materials, the development of new medicines and vaccines, as well as the characterization of soils and biological processes.

However, access to these infrastructures is unequal around the world, and low- and middle-income nations, particularly in the Wider Caribbean and Africa, face significant challenges in taking advantage of these cutting-edge scientific tools.

"And it is precisely to try to reduce this gap and fully take advantage of the scientific potential of these regions for which we are developing the Lamistad project," adds Juan Ángel Sans, researcher at the Institute of Design for Automated Manufacturing and Production and professor at the Higher Technical School of Aerospace Engineering and Industrial Design (ETSIADI) of the UPV.

The work of Pedro Fernández de Córdoba and Juan Ángel Sans focuses on the technical part of the project, as well as the promotion of communication actions; Among them, they are part of the team that is preparing a proposal that will soon be presented to UNESCO to obtain its support for this project.

"The path towards the construction of the Greater Caribbean Light Source is not going to be easy, but its completion could represent a significant step towards equity in access to science, technology and regional development. In any case, To make this vision a reality, strong support will be necessary from both the scientific community and policy makers and international organizations dedicated to the advancement of science and technology," adds Pedro Fernández de Córdoba.

Currently, in Latin America there is already a synchrotron, specifically in the city of Campinas in Brazil. The infrastructure promoted by Lamistad would be complementary and would allow addressing problems closer to the area, for example, for studies in agriculture, archeology or cultural heritage.

Additionally, the Lamistad project is establishing synergies with the African initiative to launch the African Light Source, which seeks to create a pan-African synchrotron facility. "The foundations are being laid for a connection between Africa and Latin America that promotes these facilities in both areas of the world," adds Juan Ángel Sans.

Together with researchers and professors from the UPV, this article is signed by Víctor M. Castaño, on behalf of the UNAM, and Galileo Violini, director emeritus of the International Physics Center of Bogotá.