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The US ambassador defends Biden's immigration policy and affirms that Trump left a "broken" system

MADRID, 8 Mar.

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The US ambassador defends Biden's immigration policy and affirms that Trump left a "broken" system

MADRID, 8 Mar. (EUROPA PRESS) -

The United States ambassador to Spain, Julissa Reynoso, has defended the immigration policy put into practice by the Joe Biden Administration and has warned that the current government must seek a balance between a "humanitarian" and at the same time "fair" system after Donald Trump's controversial stint in the White House.

"We inherited a broken, chaotic immigration system," Reynoso said at the Foro América, organized by Europa Press and Estudio de Comunicación, and in which he pointed out that, due to the measures applied, it can be said that "there was an almost intentional plan to break the system" in the previous Presidency.

In "a very complex time", Reynoso is in favor of working with the migrants' countries of origin to promote opportunities --"that they do not have to leave", he has pointed out-- and also for the establishment of "legal paths" for that, for example, asylum applications in the United States can be filed abroad and reduce flows in the Americas.

In all this framework, Mexico is "a key country", as the ambassador has recognized. In May, new restrictions promoted by the current US Administration will come into force to limit access to asylum for migrants who cross the southern border with the United States, in an attempt to curb irregular crossings.

"We have to share the responsibility for this situation, which is dramatic," Reynoso claimed, in front of those who have questioned the effects of the new policies and the possible continuation of the 'firm hand' promoted by Trump during his time in the House White.

Regarding the relationship between the United States and China, Reynoso has acknowledged that it is "complex." Thus, although there are areas in which they can agree or at least should collaborate, such as climate change, nuclear safety or health issues, there are also others where the two countries "have nothing to do with it".

The ambassador has stressed that Washington tries to be "as direct as possible" with Beijing. The United States expects "allies" such as Spain and other EU countries, with which it "shares values", to help make it clear that "China is alone on certain issues" or to question the possible harmful consequences of the giant's penetration Asian in Africa or Latin America.