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Groups of women protest in Afghanistan to claim their rights under the Taliban yoke

The UN estimates that 13.

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Groups of women protest in Afghanistan to claim their rights under the Taliban yoke

The UN estimates that 13.8 million women and girls will need humanitarian aid in Afghanistan this year.

MADRID, 8 Mar. (EUROPA PRESS) -

Groups of women have demonstrated in Afghanistan to demand the rights and freedoms lost since the Taliban came to power more than a year and a half ago, a time in which, according to the UN, the radicals have tried to "erase" them from public life. to half the population, relegated again under the excuse of 'sharia' and Islamic law.

In Kabul, several women have taken to the streets this Tuesday, International Women's Day, to demand "work and education," according to Tolo News. Also on Monday there were concentrations at the gates of universities, coinciding with the resumption of some classes that are now reserved for men.

The Minister of Higher Education, Neda Mohamad Nadim, has defended that the female veto at the university is only "a temporary decision" and has explained that all the expelled teachers continue to receive their salary, in an attempt to justify some biases that are also applied in secondary education or even in the workplace.

In the last quarter of 2022, the level of female employment fell by 25 percent, compared to a 7 percent drop in the case of men, according to a study by the International Labor Organization (ILO), which warns that These statistics are not specific but mark a trend.

The UN Secretary General, António Guterres, denounced this week that women have been "erased" directly from Afghan public life, confined back to the home and away from any decision-making body. The Taliban regime has not incorporated any women, despite the fact that it did commit to it after the departure of the international troops.

The United Nations has denounced an "almost constant" issuance of discriminatory norms, to the point that Afghanistan is today "the country that most represses the rights of women in the world", in the words of the head of the mission. of the UN, Roza Otunbayeva.

"Confining half the population in one of the countries with the greatest humanitarian and economic crisis to their homes is a colossal act of self-harm. It will condemn not only women and girls, but also all Afghans, to poverty and to depend on the aid in the next generations", has warned Otunbayeva.

The UN estimates that 13.8 million women and girls will need humanitarian aid in Afghanistan this year, in a particularly complex context because the Taliban lack diplomatic relations with other countries and continue to be subject to sanctions by the main Western blocs.

In fact, the European Union announced on Monday sanctions against Afghan minister Mohamed Khalid Hanafi for restricting the freedom of women and girls, limiting their freedom of expression and issuing punishments against those who do not respect the edicts of the Taliban regime.

However, what international observers do agree on is to highlight protests such as those registered even on this day. UN Women's Special Representative in Afghanistan, Alison Davidian, stressed in a statement that "Afghan women have shown incredible courage and resilience."